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Art, Literature, and Music: How Movements Drive One Another

, Art, Literature, and Music: How Movements Drive One Another

literary movement, art movement, fine art, young artist, viewing market

 

Art, Literature, and Music: How Movements Drive One Another

 

In the historical past, authors, musicians and artists frequently patronized each other’s gatherings in order to gain a sense of what was currently happening in other artistic mediums as well as to fill their own creative tanks. “The Muse,” that seemingly not-so-mythical wellspring of artistic inspiration, requires regular fuel, and in throughout history such fuel was difficult to come by. No recording techniques meant that in order to experience live music, young artists would have to view the performance live. Large paintings, fine art and sculptures produced with sensitive materials were not particularly mobile, so gallery viewers were largely confined to what was locally available. If you were outside of a large city, there simply weren’t many options for regularly consuming art, no matter what the medium.

 

literary movement, art movement, fine art, young artist, viewing market

literary movement, art movement, fine art, young artist, viewing market

 

The advent and subsequent proliferation of the Internet changed how quickly artists were able to communicate with each other, as well as how they viewed, listened to, and read each other’s fine art. Now, instead of a local gallery being available only for walk-in viewers in a particular municipality, artists could now photograph, scan, or record their productions and upload them to the Internet. The volume of fine art produced exploded, with new artists rushing to fill the viewing market this new medium provided. Many of these young artists were from (or were otherwise living in) areas that did not have access to galleries or live concerts. In this way, the Internet became a great equalizer for culture. Instead of being limited by one’s geography and funds (as well as time) to travel, now a young artist simply had to type a series of terms into a search engine in order to view high-quality representations of art, literature, and music from around the world.

 

literary movement, art movement, fine art, young artist, viewing market

literary movement, art movement, fine art, young artist, viewing market

 

As the Internet’s penetration into the larger viewing market increased, so too did the ease of art education, with full histories and glossaries available for even the most obscure literary movements as well as fine art movements. All of this convenience has come at a price for young artists, however. Though art movements and literary movements still continually drive one another, the amount of competition that young artists face is unparalleled. Never before in history has it been easier to introduce one’s work to a larger body of people, which means that many who may have not otherwise attempted to begin a career producing fine art have done so. As gallery websites, recording equipment, and scanning technology continues to improve, perhaps we will see a regression to the historical mean as fewer artists gain the patronage to continue their craft.

 

literary movement, art movement, fine art, young artist, viewing market

literary movement, art movement, fine art, young artist, viewing market

 

 

Keywords: literary movement, art movement, fine art, young artist, viewing market, art education