Art Recognition and Education

Category Archives : artists

, Kinetic Art and Sculpture

Kinetic Art and Sculpture

    Kinetic Art and Sculpture     Kinetic art is defined as any art that either contains movement as a part of its operation (i.e. a water sculpture featuring cascading water) or depends upon motion when it comes to affecting the viewer’s perception. Kinetic…

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, Photorealism in Painting

Photorealism in Painting

    Photorealism in Painting     Photorealism was an art movement that strove to reproduce objects on the canvas in almost microscopic detail, with artists adhering to representational verisimilitude (representing objects as they appear to the eye) as was within their particular skill sets….

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, Historical Giants of Abstract Art, Picasso, Matisse, Kandinsky and Delaunay

Historical Giants of Abstract Art, Picasso, Matisse, Kandinsky and Delaunay

      Historical Giants of Abstract Fine Art, Picasso, Matisse, Kandinsky and Delaunay         Abstract art, in the purest sense, uses a kind of visual language to present concepts that can be independent from real-world visual references. That is, an abstract…

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, Reviving Fine Art Movements Online

Reviving Fine Art Movements Online

    Reviving Fine Art Movements Online     Living post-Internet in a digital age, it’s perhaps easy to think each new art movement births itself spontaneously in an art forum online. Instantaneous communication has made connecting with other artists simpler ever before. Hosting digital…

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, Contemporary Folk Art in the US

Contemporary Folk Art in the US

Contemporary Folk Art in the US     In many major metropolitan areas in the US, young artists are leading urban folk art revivals that hearken back to traditional techniques used by settlers in the time before the Industrial Revolution. The market for hand-produced crafts…

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, Art Deco and the Rise of Technology

Art Deco and the Rise of Technology

Art Deco and the Rise of Technology     Art deco, to put it simply, is a style of visual excess that first rose to popularity in the years after World War I and remained a cornerstone of the international art community for decades. Even…

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, Dada, Dadaism and Early 20th Century European Avant-garde Art

Dada, Dadaism and Early 20th Century European Avant-garde Art

Dada, Dadaism and Early 20th Century European Avant-garde Art     Dadaist art (dadaism) rose in reaction to the destruction caused by World War I. The world saw an unprecedented rise in the level of technology used in war: mass-produced semi-automatic weapons, as well as…

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, Futurism within Art Movements

Futurism within Art Movements

Futurism within Art Movements       Futurism, like so many other art movements, was a product of its age. As the early 20th century continued to propel us forward into new technologies, artists began to confront this phenomenon spilling over into their works. Futurist…

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, The Lasting Effects of Cubism

The Lasting Effects of Cubism

         The Lasting Effects of Cubism     Avant-garde art in the early 20th century featured Cubism, an art movement that originated in Europe with the works of Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso and later joined by such talents as Robert Delaunay…

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, Dale Chihuly and the Art of Blown Glass

Dale Chihuly and the Art of Blown Glass

Dale Chihuly and the Art of Blown Glass     Glassblowing is a complex art form with a history of use in a wide variety of industries. Historically, most glassblowers were tradesmen producing functional, practical pieces for sale as utensils and containers, especially in the…

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, Street Art / Graffiti Art and Neighborhood Identity

Street Art / Graffiti Art and Neighborhood Identity

Street Art / Graffiti Art and Neighborhood Identity       Historically, street art has a more unsavory reputation, once simply labeled as graffiti and considered something to be removed. This was especially true during the steep rise in US drug-related gang activity in the…

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, The Pop Art Movement in the US

The Pop Art Movement in the US

The Pop Art Movement in the US       The US pop art movement was born in New York in the 1960s when artists such as James Rosenquist and Andy Warhol began co-opting well-known imagery from popular culture. Anything and everything was fair game,…

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, Salvador Dalí and the Evolution of Surrealism

Salvador Dalí and the Evolution of Surrealism

  Salvador Dalí and the Evolution of Surrealism       Perhaps one of the most widely recognizable names in the history of art, Salvador Dalí was long at the forefront of Surrealism, an art movement that emphasized the expression of the subconscious mind. Surrealism…

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, Transitioning between Two Major Art Movements

Transitioning between Two Major Art Movements

  Transitioning between Two Major Art Movements   Historically, the period between any two major fine art movements has been tumultuous, fraught with young artists proliferating a wide variety of experimental styles, with major metropolitan fine art scenes constantly birthing new schools of thought. Typically,…

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, 3D Printing and Contemporary Fine Art: What’s in Store?

3D Printing and Contemporary Fine Art: What’s in Store?

3D Printing and Contemporary Fine Art: What’s in Store?     3D printing has already fundamentally changed the manufacturing industry by giving production capacity to individuals, but how will this new technology affect the art world as it becomes more mainstream? 3D printers, both home-based…

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, Romanticism and the Industrial Revolution

Romanticism and the Industrial Revolution

  As with most major art movements, Romanticism first developed as a reaction to the dominant movement of its time: Neoclassicism. Neoclassicism, the dominant art form in Europe during the second half of the 18th century, emphasized harmony, simplicity, and evenly developed proportions, Romanticism, on…

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, The Rise of Minimalism

The Rise of Minimalism

Abstract expressionism dominated the US art scene throughout the 1950s as artists sought, in true Romantic fashion, to express their personal emotions through their art. As with any large art movement in American culture (or elsewhere), there were fringe groups that did not adopt the…

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