Art Recognition and Education

Home » Art Recognition And Education» The Lasting Effects of Cubism

The Lasting Effects of Cubism

, The Lasting Effects of Cubism

art movement, art critics, avant-garde art, Cubist works, art, cubism, artists

 

       The Lasting Effects of Cubism

 

art movement, art critics, avant-garde art, Cubist works, art, cubism, artists

art movement, art critics, avant-garde art, Cubist works, art, cubism, artists

 

Avant-garde art in the early 20th century featured Cubism, an art movement that originated in Europe with the works of Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso and later joined by such talents as Robert Delaunay and Jean Metzinger. Cubist works feature deep analysis of their subject matter as the content is broken up and spread across multiple viewpoints (as opposed to conventional forms like landscape art, where the viewer examines scenery from a single perspective). These techniques are clearly visible in Cubism’s most famous works, one of which is Metzinger’s Danseuse au café (Dancer in a Café), where the viewer can see a dancer in highly abstracted form spread across the entire canvas, with heavy play between light, shadow, and multiple perspectives.

 

art movement, art critics, avant-garde art, Cubist works, art, cubism, artists

art movement, art critics, avant-garde art, Cubist works, art, cubism, artists

 

This reassembly of objects is a common theme in Cubist works, as the goal is often to present the content in a larger context than its natural environment. Some art critics reacted negatively to such a heavy-handed approach, claiming that Cubist artists misrepresented their work in an attempt to deliberately confuse gallery viewers. Such strife at the outset of an art movement is extremely common in art history, as many of the major movements (especially prior to the proliferation of the Internet) first existed as reactions to prior movements.

 

art movement, art critics, avant-garde art, Cubist works, art, cubism, artists

art movement, art critics, avant-garde art, Cubist works, art, cubism, artists

 

Eventually, Cubism’s work with multiple perspectives came to be known as simultaneity and /or multiplicity as the movement branched out into Orphism, Purism, and abstract art. Artists began to merge not only the physical subjects within their Cubist works, but also their contexts as well, with some artists choosing to fuse the past and present as well as other elements within the work. In some countries, such fusing was a contributing factor to the rise of Surrealism, as the bizarre blended with the real in an attempt to create artistic representations of the subconscious and unconscious minds.

 

art movement, art critics, avant-garde art, Cubist works, art, cubism, artists

art movement, art critics, avant-garde art, Cubist works, art, cubism, artists

 

Art historians also struggle with identifying how much influence Cubism’s founding artists, Picasso and Braque, had over their contemporaries. Many of these artists have records of correspondence, but we must remember that physical distance meant more in an era without instant communication. Smaller metropolitan art scenes outside major cities in Europe put their own touches on Cubist works, often lending influences from other art movements to produce pieces that did not give the same impression of tight control evident in many of Picasso’s Cubist pieces. These minor conflicts served to give art critics more to dissect as the issues of message and personal biography continued to be debated in how they ultimately affected an artist’s working content.

 

art movement, art critics, avant-garde art, Cubist works, art, cubism, artists

art movement, art critics, avant-garde art, Cubist works, art, cubism, artists

 

art movement, art critics, avant-garde art, Cubist works, art, cubism, artists

art movement, art critics, avant-garde art, Cubist works, art, cubism, artists

 

 

Keywords: art movement, art critics, avant-garde art, Cubist works, art, cubism, artists